Rob Ford made a surprise appearance on the show tonight.

Mayor Rob Ford calls into Friendly Fire on NewsTalk 1010 to explain why he’s looking into Canada’s citizenship and immigration policies in hopes of ridding Toronto of gun-toting thugs.

At PFLAG event, Rob Ford turns the corner

This is where, if I were petty, I’d call the Mayor a flip-flopper. But this is no day for name-calling.

Despite Rob Ford’s continued resistance to playing any role in supporting Toronto’s gay community, he stunned the crowd at City Hall today by showing up to read a declaration marking the International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia. Onlookers welcomed the surprise with rousing applause.

Ford stood at the podium, flanked by beaming city councilors who normally would never be caught smiling in reaction to one of the Mayor’s actions.

Ford stumbled through the reading of the declaration (clearly written for him). And he looked rather uncomfortable, wincing through each word. (Although the midday sun was probably to blame for that.)

But while his performance was far from graceful, his decision to show up was exactly that.

On a small scale, this day was about Ford finally recognizing he has a role to play at this city event. He may have been forced into showing up by his advisors, but it doesn’t really matter.

Rob Ford - our Mayor - changed his mind. He did what all his foes on council had been badgering him to do. Undoubtedly, some will say he caved to political pressure. But a more mature analysis will conclude he adapted for the good of the city.

While his supporters will describe Ford as unwavering, the rest have chosen a more accurate word to describe his attitude: pigheaded. Unwavering is a term one can only use to describe a person who has the moral authority on his side. But reason and logic have so far tended to avoid Ford throughout his term.

Today, however, Ford became a part of something he was initially dead set against. Is it totally unreasonable to hope he might be capable of showing the same flexibility with a council that now has one less reason to dislike him?

FRIENDLY FIRE SUBWAY DEBATES: PART 4

John Downs and Ryan Doyle hit the tunnels again - this time to debate government-mandated nutritional information in fast-food chains. Who wins? You decide - so don’t forget to vote.

TAKE A LISTEN

Levity fail on Friendly Fire on NewsTalk 1010. What a nice story … Tim Hortons employee helps deliver a baby in the washroom. How could this interview go wrong?

Naked Brunch

You know how those gays are into those nasty sex acts? The sodomy and male on male/female on female oral sex? Well, they never would have started down that road of perverted pleasure if no one had let them in on it in the first place.

Or so goes the logic of Charles McVety, president of the Canada Christian College. Speaking at Queen’s Park, the Reverend urged MPPs not to pass Bill 13, the Accepting Schools Act.

The bill “embraces a radical sex education agenda,” and as a result children will be taught about “oral and anal sex,” he says.

"My daughter is a precious little 14-year-old girl. I beg you not to do this to my daughter."

Can’t you see it now? Strange men and women in white coveralls, forcing innocent little kids across the province into a dentist-like chair and strapping them in by the arms, legs and head. Their eyelids pinned open like something out of a Kubrick flick. The grainy film stock begins to roll and horrendous images of same-sex couples lovingly raising children are flashed across the screen. A man at his husband’s bedside as he recovers in hospital from an illness. And no … it’s not that scene from Philadelphiawhere Tom Hanks bites it because he had unprotected sex in a porn theatre. Although, I’m sure opponents of the bill would love to slip that one into the curriculum.

And kudos to Kim Galvao, director of Concerned Catholic Parents of Ontario who states, “Our children don’t need more sex education. They need less.”

Hear, hear! Galvao’s right. Why bring the dirty topics of sex and sexuality into the already sterile environment we call “schools.” There’s a plethora of graphic sexual imagery online, and we all know the internet is a domain children are quite adept of navigating. So let them run free on search engines and Urban Dictionary. I mean honestly, you think kids need context when it comes to learning about the exciting world of Cleveland steamers and hot lunches? We all know the only hot lunches children should know about are in the cafeteria. More cherry pie, please!

Yes, there have been a few stories out of the United States – that bastion of over-liberalized sexual instruction.

January 21, 2011: A California elementary school teacher has been suspended indefinitely after school officials said a pair of second-graders performed sex acts.

April 18, 2012: Police were called to Evanston Township High School after a school officer found a 14-year-old male student allegedly forcing a 15-year-old girl to perform asex act on him in a stairwell.

March 22, 2012: Fishers police say an eight-year-old girl and a 13-year-old boy were caught in a sexual act on a school bus in Hamilton County, Ind.

What do you want to bet all those kids were simply eager to try out the moves they had just learned about in school? You know, like the first time someone taught you to snap your fingers or make fart noises with your armpit.

This whole debate could easily be sidestepped by just providing kids with one simple directive: “You know that thing that we won’t tell you about? Don’t do it.”

Rob Ford finally finds gravy … at a KFC

Toronto’s mayor is spotted, filmed and mocked walking into a west-end KFC. A concerned citizen reminds him he’s supposed to be LOSING weight. Ford brushes her off. And now the real story …

The Toronto Star makes the incident the lead story on its website.

The reader comments on the article fall into one of two categories: “He had it coming” and “Shame on you Toronto Star.” Both sides are right.

Rob Ford (or those orchestrating his every breath) made a big deal about his “Cut the Waist Challenge.” But it appears there was more thought put into what kind of old-timey scale they should acquire for the weekly weigh-ins than into whether the mayor might actually be capable of shedding the targeted 50 pounds.

As the weeks passed and Ford stumbled - even failing to show up for some weigh-ins altogether - what began as a light-hearted exercise became an uncomfortable Monday-morning routine of hide-and-seek. The atmosphere turned to caustic from carnival.

And so the Cut the Waist Challenge emits a death rattle coinciding with Rob Ford’s hankering for the Colonel’s secret recipe. All public and all embarrassing. But Ford pulled the trigger on this dirty bird. Had he been walking through the door of any other fast-food place, he could have declared, “I was getting the salad,” and who would we be to challenge that claim? But no one on this planet goes to KFC for salad. This is the equivalent of an alcoholic doing a cannonball into a beer vat.

So those who say this is not news couldn’t be further off the mark. Why then is the Star also worthy of criticism? The paper’s ongoing feud with Ford is no secret. Ford has felt unfairly targeted by the paper, and the paper likes to remind readers - often - that the mayor will no longer speak to its reporters. In fact, just a day ago, the Star ran a piece about how it had been excluded from the ribbon cutting of a new downtown hotel attended by both The Donald and The Ford. So, justified as any publication might be to run the KFC story, when the Star does it, it reeks of blatant mockery and borderline bullying.

By not making this story the first on its website, the Star might have gained a kernel of credibility. But for this long-time Toronto daily, that bird has flown the coop.

O Canada? Oh brother

Kids in school aren’t singing along to the national anthem, so let’s turn down the music and force them to belt it out a cappella.

Yes, a Toronto school trustee is trying to mandate that students sing it loud and sing it proud.

Dare we mention, “patriotism” doesn’t mean as much when it’s forced. While we’re at it, why not have the kids raise their right hand every time they goose step past the Maple Leaf?

Of course, let’s not frighten the people with that totalitarian imagery. After all, O Canada is just a pleasant tune that we should all WANT to sing. But maybe not all of us want to sing ALL of it. It is a little awkward when those who don’t believe in an all-powerful being get to that part about asking God to keep our land glorious and free.

And come to think of it, what HAVE I been singing in French at hockey games anyway?

"Thy arm ready to wield the sword,

So also is it ready to carry the cross.”

Really? Ya, count me out on that too.

Along with considering the lyrics, can we please consider the venues? Sporting events involving teams from different cities, city council meetings … we’re half a beat away from being expected to sing it when we take our car in for a lube and filter change.

Of course, one can surmise that because I think singing the national anthem is silly, I must hate Canada.

It’s quite the opposite, actually. I really appreciate this country. In fact, compared with almost all others in the world, it’s a place I’m proud to call home.

But let’s not kid ourselves. For those of us who were born here, it was dumb luck. We may have plopped out of our moms in Germany, Uganda or China. And as for the latter, we wouldn’t have much choice of whether we were required to show dedication to our leader, our flag or our “way of life.” And that’s exactly why I love Canada. Because I can choose too.

Who’s the real punk, Mike Milbury?

He’s touted as the logical heir to Don Cherry on Hockey Night in Canada.

And if the (once) venerable Canadian institution manages to tread water until Cherry finally exits, Mike Milbury would appear suited to fill the role.

No, it has nothing to do with mammoth shirt collars or his love for the military. The size of Milbury’s mouth and his dangerously regressive nature would make him the ideal candidate. In a recent attack on Sidney Crosby, Milbury branded the Penguins Captain a “punk.”He has since apologized for the name-calling, which he admitted was “inappropriate and wrong”.   

 Apology or not, Milbury’s language is clear."Little goody two shoes [Crosby] goes into the corner and gives a shot to Schenn. Schenn was late to the party, he should have turned around and drilled him right away, but I guess better late than never."
 
Class.
 
For a guy who just a year ago finally appeared to recognize the only reason for fighting in hockey – “because we like it” – Milbury appears to have taken a tumble back into the Stone Age. But that’s not the worst of the comments. Pens coach Dan Bylsma was apparently not man enough to jump on to the ice to take on his Philly counterpart, Peter Laviolette, face to face.

"I thought Dan Bylsma should have taken off his skirt and gone over there."

Astounding.

This is where Milbury earns a red card, to borrow from another sport. It’s also the reason why he should be getting a pink slip from the CBC. Milbury is essentially calling Dan Bylsma a girl for not fighting. The comment is at the very least, incredibly sexist. At its worst, it effectively illustrates everything that is wrong with fighting in hockey, the NHL, loud-mouthed media (yes, I appreciate the irony) and old white guys who have no business being part of a 21st-century discussion.

It will, of course, be the old white men who will jump to Milbury’s defence. Because they’re the ones who “get” him. In their world, a woman’s place is in the home tending to the children. Asians are identified by their shade of colour and voting for any other party than Conservative would be downright treasonous.

Mr. Milbury, if you still live in a world where calling another man a “woman” constitutes an insult, you can stay there. Please stay out of mine.

“I am going to do everything in my power to stop the LRTs from going in on Sheppard and Eglinton because I love the people of Scarborough and they said fight and I am going to fight.” - Rob Ford
Just give it up already.

An open letter to Rob Ford

Marcus Gee’s latest column from The Globe and Mail pretty much sums it up